books Patton: A Genius for War By Carlo D'Este – Gsagency.co

Based On Exclusive Access To His Personal And Public Papers, And With The Full Cooperation Of His Family, Patton Is An Intimate Look At The Colorful, Charismatic, And Sometimes Controversial Man Who Became The One General The Germans Respected And Feared The Most During World War II Photos


10 thoughts on “Patton: A Genius for War

  1. says:

    Where do I start Killing a gang member and tying his corpse to the hood of his car, slapping two soldiers in Sicily for being cowards, urinating in the Rhine Sitting in the front row of a pew in church with a watch timing a chaplain s sermons when he said they should be no than ten minutes Exploits to get gas for his tanks Repeatedly told his troops that if they failed he did not want see them alive Soldiers would kidnap his dog in the middle of the month when they ran short of money and returned it for the 2.00 reward The armed forces certainly have their share of drama queens and Patton is no exception It certainly wasn t boring For all the outlandishness that was General George S Patton, D Este does a great job of portraying the good with the bad Patton was deeply religious, wrote poetry, and cared for his soldiers and never asked them to do what he was unwilling to do himself His was a constant presence I seriously think Patton could scare the devil And I think he fell one to many times from his horse and it affected his brain However, I share the opinion of his soldiers that were I going through the very depths of hell, there would be no one else I would want leading me.


  2. says:

    An outstanding 1996 biography, written so as to truly bring Patton to life for the reader Though very long, there would be no way to cut it shorter without damaging the portrait of this soldier Since I served in his Third Army during the Battle of the Bulge and onward east until we met with the Russians, it meant a great deal to me on the personal front He wrote poetry, he cried much and often, he read Thucydides, he road horses all his life and fell off them, he often prayed in church, he was charming to polite society, married a strong wealthy woman, swore like a trooper before and at the men he led in battle, was acknowledged by German military leaders as clearly the most formidable general among English and French and American generals during WWII, died in Germany when not wearing a vehicular seat belt, and is remembered best for slapping a soldier in Sicily.The book portrays General Patton with all his strengths, personal characteristics, human touches, religious dimension, forceful demanding leadership, and his several bad actions which brought down so much criticism on him right to the end of his life The book shows that a fine historian a retired US military officer can produce a fine biography fifty years after the death of his subject much complete, balanced, through and fair, than could have been written after a year or a few years One critic has written More than anything his spiritual experience on the battle field at St Mihiel in WW1 was a pivotal experience, in which momentarily he saw the wholeness of life, as encompassing life and death, and felt surrounded by a profound love that made everything good Clearly this must have been the reservoir from which his otherwise incomprehensible courage and fearlessness stemmed, and which was therefore not bravura or recklessness in the final analysis Many of his contemporaries, who lacked his depth, were completely puzzled, if not overwhelmed or intimidated by this dimension of his character And, of course, this is not to say that he did not go overboard from time to time, as clearly he did.The stories of him practicing his warface in front of the bathroom mirror, to unending amusement of his kids all the while complaining that God had given him such a nice face, if he was clearly destined to be a fierce warrior, is another human interest dimension which lends a depth to his character which most biographers miss altogether.Very pleased that my son Jeff gave this biography to me a month ago, and he must have known for certain that it would hold my interest from start to end as it did.


  3. says:

    Liked the movie This book is so much deeper and interesting than any film Patton himself is so much than George C Scott could portray in film D Este captures the many sides of Patton I appreciated, too, that D Este recognizes that his family was a part of who he was, so his wife is not left out I found her to be every bit as admirable as the General.


  4. says:

    George Smith Patton Jr was a man of many contrasts and many faces He was an insecure dyslexic, obsessed with his glorious ancestors, a brash martinet, a genus of menouvre and made impulsive, reckless speeches that required his friends to get him out of trouble on frequent occasions not that he was ever grateful.This is a fine biography of a very complex man Lt Col Carlo D Este walks the difficult line of showing Patton as a great war leader and a poor politician and an impulsive man.It is interesting the conjecture that the author ends with as to how the war would have progressed had Patton rather than Bradley, his former subordinate, been in charge of the allied forces in the Western theatre in WW2 A very enjoyable biography.Despite his personal failings, I still think of Patton as the best general in the West I will be following the Third Army route in to Germany in three weeks and visiting Patton s grave For all his flaws, we owe him and his troops much.


  5. says:

    Packed with information but very readable Patton was an arrogant, violent, self absorbed asshole, that s for sure, but the United States was very lucky to have him In that regard the title of the book describes him best Actually, Patton had a soft side, especially for his dog, Willie Much to Patton s chagrin, William the Conqueror, turned out to be a coward, but Patton dearly loved that dog, even curling up with him every night One of the most poignant pictures associated with Patton is the one of Willie moping after Patton s death in a car accident in Germany.http www.olive drab.com gallery des D este did a beautiful job developing Patton s personality from early childhood through the West Point years where the ambitious Patton that we all know was solidified The only slow part of the book was the interwar years of the 1920s and early 30s, and that is because it was in many ways the most inane periods in US history Of course, it was the time of the Great Depression, and the fact that there is almost no mention of it speaks volumes about the wealth of the Patton family.I think what I liked most about Patton was not his military genius and accomplishments but his love for reading and learning This book is perhaps the best combination of biography and war history that I have ever read If you are into that sort of book, then you will love this one.


  6. says:

    This is a big, thorough biography, covering both the general s achievements and blunders I think the author is mostly a Pattonphile, but he does not cover up or gloss over Patton s deficiencies and blunders Myself, I wish there were details on the campaigns Exactly what did he do, what tactics did he employ, how did he train his soldiers to accomplish his and their victories That, however, may well double the size of already a large book and a good read The author uses many sources, including other books, and gives credit for their insight He also compares the real Patton to George C Scott s portrayal in the movie Some interesting facts come out for instance, there was no real competition between Patton and the British general Montgomery, both being consummate professionals in their craft Patton s greatest achievement was likely his relief of Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge General Omar Bradley does not come out well in this book, and it may make interesting reading to read the author s 2002 book on General Eisenhower Patton s ancestry, youth, and between the wars experiences are well covered and will lend insight to his mindset his dyslexia and head accidents may explain a lot as well His wife deserves a lot of credit, and gets it here, for her loyalty and support and family fortune Enjoy the read.


  7. says:

    This is a priceless biography, and it far and away dominates the field Carlo D Este had the capacity to capture the whole person including Patton s fascinating spiritual dimension, which hinged on a dual devotion to the Bible and the Bhagavadgita He understood like no other that it was his dharma to be a soldier, and he was going to be the best soldier he could be, without holding back.More than anything his spirtual experience on the battle field at St Mihiel in WW1 was a pivotal expience, in which momentarily he saw the wholeness of life, as encompassing life and death, and felt surrounded by a profound love that made everything good Clearly this must have been the reservoir from which his otherwise incomprehensible courage and fearlessness stemmed, and which was therefore not bravura or recklessness in the final analysis Many of his contemporaries, who lacked his depth, were completely puzzled, if not overwhelmed or intimidated by this dimension of his character And, of course, this is not to say that he did not go overboard from time to time, as clearly he did.The stories of him practicing his warface in front of the bathroom mirror, to unending amusement of his kids all the while complaining that God had given him such a nice face, if he was clearly destined to be a fierce warrior, is another human interest dimension which lends a depth to his character which most biographers miss altogether.Recommended, a classic.


  8. says:

    A wonderful look at a man who was always the professional soldier with a warrior poet s heart.


  9. says:

    The end of war is, in short, a sort of massive hangover, a culture shock that often manifests itself in antisocial behavior, alcoholism, and severe depression A quote located on page 268 of this book This was a statement that the author placed upon the conclusion of Colonel George S Patton s experience of the First World War At the conclusion of the Second World War that same depressive feeling that Patton had in November 1918 would be only expounded exponentially in November of 1945.This account of General Patton s whole life is nothing short of excellent Sources are well cited in each chapter and the overall work is a comprehensive and objective view on one of America s best soldiers of either the First or Second World Wars.Had General Patton lived longer it is quite possible that there would have been medical evidence to show he suffered from PTSD though not something diagnosed as such during this particular time frame in history The term burn out appears several times throughout the book, and as the book was published in 1995 the term PTSD was still to this point not a fully recognized condition of an effect upon persons who have been in a combat environment The tragic death of General Patton came at a time when he had reached his destiny his own efforts to reach that destiny never seemed to encompass what he would do after the destiny had been reached I am a bit on the fence when it comes to any potential assassination plot on the one hand there was an accident and yet, unlike the JFK assassination this death seems to me to be likely to have actually had a conspiracy behind it Still, the author takes an objective, primary source review to dispel this myth and one cannot help but feel it is the truth in this sense General Patton was certainly one of a kind and, a fellow Soldier I understood with each page and readily accepted on those surprise moments of his personal life.


  10. says:

    A good biography of a very complicated and fascinating figure in American military history This book is surprisingly not boring or too overly detailed given its nearly 1,000 page length The author presents Patton as a man who lived, breathed and thought almost solely of war and the glory inherent in it While a great military leader and an innovative tactician, Patton was no doubt in many respects a man out of his time who might have felt comfortable charging up the slopes at Gettysburg or following King Richard in the Third Crusade The same militaristic spirit that made him a great fighter led him to struggle with containing his speech and passions, and eventually was his downfall Patton was certainly in the right place at the right time in the European Theater of WW2, and the free world owes him a great debt as the general the Germans feared and respected than any other Allied commander.