Staying Roman 82 Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and

What did it mean to be Roman once the Roman Empire had collapsed in the West? Staying Roman examines Roman identities in the region of modern Tunisia and Algeria between the fifth century Vandal conquest and the seventh century Islamic invasions Using historical archaeological and epigraphic evidence this study argues that the fracturing of the empire's political unity also led to a fracturing of Roman identity along political cultural and religious lines as individuals who continued to feel 'Roman' but who were no longer living under imperial rule sought to redefine what it was that connected them to their fellow Romans elsewhere The resulting definitions of Romanness could overlap but were not always mutually reinforcing Significantly in late antiquity Romanness had a practical value and could be used in remarkably flexible ways to foster a sense of similarity or difference over space time and ethnicity in a wide variety of circumstancesWhat did it mean to be Roman once the Roman Empire had collapsed in the West? Staying Roman examines Roman identities in the region of modern Tunisia and Algeria between the fifth century Vandal conquest and the seventh century Islamic invasions Using historical archaeological and epigraphic evidence this study argues that the fracturing of the empire's political unity also led to a fracturing of Roman identity along political cultural and religious lines as individuals who continued to feel 'Roman' but who were no longer living under imperial rule sought to redefine what it was that connected them to their fellow Romans elsewhere The resulting definitions of Romanness could overlap but were not always mutually reinforcing Significantly in late antiquity Romanness had a practical value and could be used in remarkably flexible ways to foster a sense of similarity or difference over space time and ethnicity in a wide variety of circumstancesWhat did it mean to be Roman once the Roman Empire had collapsed in the West? Staying Roman examines Roman identities in the region of modern Tunisia and Algeria between the fifth century Vandal conquest and the seventh century Islamic invasions Using historical archaeological and epigraphic evidence this study argues that the fracturing of the empire's political unity also led to a fracturing of Roman identity along political cultural and religious lines as individuals who continued to feel 'Roman' but who were no longer living under imperial rule sought to redefine what it was that connected them to their fellow Romans elsewhere The resulting definitions of Romanness could overlap but were not always mutually reinforcing Significantly in late antiquity Romanness had a practical value and could be used in remarkably flexible ways to foster a sense of similarity or difference over space time and ethnicity in a wide variety of circumstances


1 thoughts on “Staying Roman 82 Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought Fourth Series

  1. says:

    Excellent analysis of the evolving definition of Romanness in north Africa after the Vandal conquest and the Byzantine reconquest The dynamics of interaction between Arian Vandal Catholic Romano Africans indigenous Moors and Byzantine Greeks resisted a simplistic narrative of ethnic tropes and religious conflicts though like all history there's enough truth in such descripions to make such simplifications tempting I found the analysis of names in order to assess patterns of migration or assimilation a bit of a stretch but this seems to be an accepted method of gleaning information that is poorly documented otherwise The rationale for Justinians's invasion of Vandal Africa is sketched but no definite conclusion reached Was it the usurpation of a Romano Vandal king's throne the rescue of not really persecuted Catholics or the temptation to pluck low lying imperial fruit that decided the issue? Maybe all three but I get the idea that Justiinan had a vision of Making Rome Great Again sorry couldn't resist that required imperial overstretch not only in Africa but in Syria Spain and Italy as well A valuable addition to any library interested in Roman Byzantine or barbarian history